Knight Center
Knight Center

Topic “Brazil”

What to do after losing your job at a newspaper: Brazilian reporter creates a profitable startup and hires 20 journalists

This story is part of a series on Innovative Journalism in Latin America and the Caribbean.(*)

When he was laid off from Folha de S. Paulo in 2014, political reporter and columnist Fernando Rodrigues did not stop his behind-the-scenes coverage of power in Brasilia. He continued to write for his blog, which he had kept for 14 years, and to participate in a radio show. Shortly thereafter, he launched his own company, an innovative startup that has been growing, making profits and hiring journalists. Read more »

Latin Americans can earn travel grants for workshop in Brazil on journalism and internet policies

Journalists from Latin American countries have until Feb. 3 to apply to attend a two-week workshop in São Paulo, Brazil on journalism and internet policies. InternetLab, which organizes the crash course, offers travel grants to cover the cost of lodging for journalists selected for the program. Read more »

Crowdfunding campaign seeks to help a one-person newspaper in Brazilian Amazon stay alive

For almost thirty years, Lúcio Flávio Pinto has been the sole writer and editor of a unique and independent newspaper, which investigators and closely monitors in the powerful in Pará and the rest of Brazil’s Amazon region. His reporting made him a renowned and award-winning journalist around the globe, but also attracted threats and attacks. Read more »

Latin American journalists among winners of the King of Spain Awards

Journalists from Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico and Uruguay were among the winners of the King of Spain International Journalism Awards on Jan. 24 in its 34th edition, news agency EFE reported. Read more »

Coverage of Rio’s favelas increased in quality and volume in international media in the pre-Olympic years, says report

In nearly eight years of anticipation for the 2016 Olympic Games, the reporters who occupied the city of Rio de Janeiro tried to understand one of the most complex Carioca characteristics to "translate:" the favelas. Between 2008 and 2016, the volume of articles published in the international press that mentioned these communities rose almost seven times, to a total of 1,094 reports. Read more »

Mexico and Brazil among the deadliest countries for journalists in 2016, according to CPJ

Although the number of murders of journalists in the world has dropped from record levels, two Latin American countries are among the deadliest for communicators in 2016, according to the year-end report from the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). Read more »

Journalists in Rio de Janeiro show how to break banalization of urban violence in news coverage

Journalist Thiago Antunes was working in the newsroom of newspaper O Dia on Nov. 28, 2015 when news broke at dawn: 111 shots from rifles and pistols were fired by the military police at five youths in the Lagartixa favela in Costa Barros, a poor neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro’s northern zone. Read more »

Reporters Without Borders wants to increase its presence in Latin America, invests in a regional office in Brazil

Reporters Without Borders (RSF for its acronym in French), a nonprofit organization that defends freedoms of expression and information, has been investing in Brazil to increase visibility and presence in the country. In 2015, RSF opened a regional office for Latin America in Rio de Janeiro and launched  a version of its site in Portuguese at the end of November 2016. Read more »

Reports on executions, violence and trafficking take home the Latin American Investigative Journalism Award

The 14th Latin American Investigative Journalism Award honored works that uncovered extrajudicial executions in Mexico, violent conflicts over land and timber in Brazil and the trafficking of cultural heritage throughout the region. Read more »

Brazilian judge revokes authorization to access journalist's phone records

Update (Dec. 2, 2016):  A judge has revoked authorization to access the telephone records of journalist Andreza Matais.

A Såo Paulo court recently ruled that investigators could access Matais’ telephone records. The decision was related to a series of reports written by the journalist in Folha de S. Paulo newspaper in 2012. Matais now works at O Estado de S. Paulo.

Judge Rubens Pedreiro Lopes of the São Paulo Police Investigations Department made the decision to revoke that authorization on Dec. 2. Read more »


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