Knight Center
Knight Center

Topic “investigative journalism”

Group of renowned Latin American journalists launch center for transnational investigative journalism

Five renowned journalists in Latin America just launched a new journalistic project that seeks to use collaborative investigative journalism to explain phenomena that cross borders in the region.

The Latin American Center for Investigative Journalism (CLIP, for its acronym in Spanish), will tackle transnational issues like large-scale corruption and illegal or abusive practices. Read more »


Peruvian journalist launches first collaborative journalism platform on public health in Latin America

Salud con Lupa is the first platform in Latin America dedicated to collaborative journalism covering topics related to public health. Read more »


With debut series on Operation Car Wash, new media outlet combines investigative journalism and political satire

Journalistic investigations about issues of impact are often complex, especially long-term ones. They mix documents, people, companies and authorities in often elaborate storylines in which it is easy to get lost. Difficulties understanding the content may lead to losing the audience for extremely important reporting, despite the journalist’s best intentions to make it clear and well-explained. Read more »


Investigative journalists from Nicaragua, Mexico and Panama join ranks of the ICIJ

Journalists from Nicaragua, Mexico and Panama are now among the 54 professionals from Latin America in the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ).

The ICIJ, the collaborative network behind investigations like the Panama Papers and Paradise Papers, welcomed 18 new members on April 29. There are now 249 journalists in more than 90 countries in the group.

In Latin America, 19 countries are represented. Read more »


Judge gives order to freeze assets of Peruvian media outlet Ojo Público and two investigative journalists

A Peruvian judge has ordered the freezing of all assets and a mandate to appear for investigative site Ojo Público, its executive director, Óscar Castilla and journalist Edmundo Cruz, of the newspaper La República. Read more »


Investigative journalism helps to shed light on murders of communicators in Brazil

Following the murders of two Brazilian radio journalists, two investigative journalists left Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo for cities in the interior of the country where the killings had taken place. There, they helped reveal networks of interests and intrigues that may have motivated the two crimes. Police investigations of the cases have led to legal accusations against 17 people, now in jail and awaiting trial. Read more »


Reports from El Salvador, Venezuela, Brazil and Panama win at the Latin American Awards for Investigative Journalism

Journalists from El Salvador, Venezuela, Brazil and Panama were winners at the 15th edition of the Latin American Awards for Investigative Journalism. The Press and Society Institute (IPYS for its acronym in Spanish) and nonprofit Transparency International revealed the winners on Nov. 5 during the 2017 Latin American Conference for Investigative Journalism (COLPIN). Read more »


Convicted politicians and paradigm changes for journalists: effects of the global Lava Jato scandal

On July 12, a Brazilian federal judge sentenced former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva to nine and a half years in prison for corruption, obstruction of justice and money laundering in relation to the Lava Jato case, a corruption scheme in at least 12 countries involving several Brazilian companies and politicians in Latin America. Read more »


Journalists from 11 countries join efforts for website covering the Lava Jato corruption scandal

A political scandal that transcends borders, such as Operation Car Wash –the network of corruption and money laundering that originated in Brazil and involves politicians and businessmen from several countries– requires cross-border, collaborative and persistent journalistic work. Read more »


Mexican reporters create lab that offers scholarships to promote investigative journalism in their country

The “barrage” of censorship and pressure to which Mexican journalists have been exposed in recent years reminds reporter Alexandra Xanic of the 1990s. The dependence of the media on official advertising, reductions in newsrooms and the search by media outlets to “fill spaces,” mean that investigative journalism is increasingly forgotten, and the little that is done fails to have the impact it should. Read more »


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