JOURNALISM IN THE AMERICAS

A News Blog

Since Google and Verizon on Monday released a proposal for regulating information flow on the Internet, the net neutrality debate has been raging, reported Newsweek magazine. read more »

Other Related Headlines:
» Google, Verizon Pitch New Net Neutrality Plan (PC World)
» Facts about Google's network neutrality policy proposal (Official Google Blog)

A driver, a security guard and a technician from TV Brasil were assaulted by a group of 10 armed robbers on Tuesday, Aug. 10, in the Tijuca National Park in Rio de Janeiro, reported O Globo. The victims were in the park repairing a broadcast antenna. read more »

Journalists in the interior of Brazil are complaining of various attacks and threats involving politicians and their parties during the ongoing election period. Journalist Bruno de Lima, from the small state of Paraíba, in the northeast of the country, said he had received death threats after publishing stories about pedophilia in the state, explained Paraíba Agora. read more »

The office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) expressed “deep concern” over threats received by Fausto Rosario Adames, the editor of the now-closed newspapers Clave and Clave Digital, after he had published articles about drug trafficking. read more »

Journalists from around the world can participate in a fellowship program Reagan-Fascell Democracy to spend five months in Washington, D.C., working on democracy-related research, according to IJNet. read more »

Faced with systematic attacks against journalists and the media in parts of Mexico, the United Nations (U.N.) and the Organization of American States (OAS) have proposed a new risk category for reporters who work in conflict zones that aren't within the definition of war outlined by international treaties, reported La Jornada. read more »

Other Related Headlines:
» Mexican parties question President Calderon's strategy against crime (EFE)
» Chronicle of a historic protest of Mexican journalists (Knight Center)
» Hundreds of Mexican journalists march to demand an end to violence and intimidation (Knight Center)

One fourth of adults worldwide read a daily newspaper everyday, according to the annual "World Press Trends" report, explained Editor & Publisher.

The report from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers was generally optimistic, Editor & Publisher said. read more »

President Barack Obama on Tuesday signed into law a measure to protect U.S. journalists, writers and publishers from libel lawsuits filed in other countries, reported the news agency AFP.

Known as "libel tourism," the new law will shield journalists from suits filed in countries with fewer freedom of speech rights than those provided in the United States. read more »

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca is refusing to release 40-year-old records related to the death of Ruben Salazar who was killed by a deputy while covering a war protest in 1970, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Salazar, a Mexican-American community advocate, columnist for the Los Angeles Times and news director for KMEX-TV, believed police were following him and trying to discredit him. read more »

The following account is a testimony from Marcela Turati, of the Red de Periodistas de a Pie (On-the-ground Journalists Network), one of the organizers of the unprecedented demonstrations in Mexico protesting the violence against journalists. read more »

Rodolfo Flórez, who has been missing since July 9, was found in Cali on Aug. 5 in good health, but confused and upset, reported the Foundation for Press Freedom (FLIP) via IFEX. read more »

The Inter American Press Association (IAPA) denounced the decision of the prosecution in Uruguay to call for two years imprisonment for journalist Álvaro Alfonso, who is accused of defamation. The prosecution also is looking to confiscate all copies of Alfonso's book, “Secrets of the Communist Party.” read more »

More than 1,000 reporters, editors, camera operators and photographers took to the streets in Mexico City and other towns in 11 states in defense of freedom of expression, calling for an end to violence against journalists, which has claimed at least 64 lives in the last decade, and left another 11 missing, reported the Latin American Herald Tribune and CBS News. read more »

Other Related Headlines:
» From the journalists, silence as a protest (El Universal)
» We are not one, we are not 100 (Milenio)
» Juarez police arrest their own leaders (BBC Mundo)

The organization Human Rights Watch (HRW) said it is important to change parts of the proposed communications law in Ecuador in order to protect freedom of expression. read more »

Sentenced to 23-and-a-half years in prison for his role in the death of television journalist Tim Lopes of TV Globo, Elizeu Felício de Souza is far from serving his jail time: he is freely selling drugs in the streets of Morro do Alemão, a shantytown in the north of Rio de Janeiro, according to Fantástico. read more »

Mexican photogrpaher Alejandro Cossío, of the weekly ZETA in Tijuana, was awarded for his work “Mexico at the Breaking Point,” announced the Ibero-American New Journalism Foundation (FNPI). read more »

Ex-Cuban president, Fidel Castro, who reappeared before international press in a special Parliamentary session on Saturday, Aug. 7, gave his first interview in four years to a group of Venezuelan journalists, to whom he spoke about the possibility of nuclear war, U.S. President Barack Obama, and the Afghanistan War, reported the newspaper La Jornada and the Cuban News Agency. read more »

Other Related Headlines:
» VVTV "landed" in Cuba this weekend and Mario Silva interviewed Fidel Castro (Noticias 24)

After conducting a nationwide search, MTV has announced who will be the music television network's first T.J., or Twitter jockey, The New York Times reported.

Gabi Gregg, 23, of Chicago, was named winner. She founded the popular blog Young, Fat and Fabulous. read more »

A music critic for the Cleveland Plain Dealer who was taken off the beat after a series of negative reviews about the city's orchestra has lost the lawsuit he filed against the newspaper and the Cleveland Orchestra, according to The New York Times. read more »

TBD.com, a new online, local news website based in Washington, D.C., is following a model that sets it apart from other online news sites: it is producing original content while also using a network of 127 local bloggers, launching with two mobile applications, partnering with two local television stations to provide videos, and focusing on social media like Twitter as news gathering tools, according to Vadim Lavrusik of Mashable.com. read more »

Other Related Headlines:
» Are hyperlocal news sites replacing traditional newspapers? (Time)
» 'New York Times,' NYU to collaborate on hyperlocal site this fall (Editor&Publisher)