JOURNALISM IN THE AMERICAS

A News Blog

TOPIC: hurricane


Five years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, media critics and journalists reflect back on how reporters covered the disaster. read more »

The names Gustav, Ike and Paloma have recently joined the usual cast of heroes in Cuba's prolific propaganda war. "After 50 years of touting the success of the Cuban revolution via street murals, public rallies and the state-run media, the three storms that pummeled the island earlier this year (have) provided a new platform for the government's propaganda campaign," the Miami Herald reports. read more »

The Galveston County Daily News in Texas managed to keep publishing, even when Hurricane Ike tore off part of the roof and reduced its equipment to a single cell phone, the Houston Chronicle reports.

Editor Heber Taylor was blogging as the eye of the storm passed over the coastal city. The power went out as he put the period to his last sentence: "We are about to lose contact." read more »

Two days after Hurricane Ike hit the Turks and Caicos Islands (see video), a Caribbean media company produced, printed, and delivered a post-hurricane paper edition of “Turks and Caicos Net News,” the Caribbean Net News reported. (See the newspaper here.) read more »

As Hurricane Ike assaulted the Caribbean, destroying homes and forcing evacuations, officials in Havana, Cuba, dismantled several radio transmission towers and advised listeners to tune instead to television for weather reports and official instructions, the official Cuban News Agency reported. read more »

The Times-Picayune has not delivered a print paper since Saturday and has been without power since Monday morning when Hurricane Gustav hit New Orleans. But the staff has remained in the main building and with the help of a generator has produced a full edition for the web site, writes Joe Strupp of Editor & Publisher. read more »

Before Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005, hurricanes were considered stories that lasted only a couple days, but Katrina’s enormity caught TV networks unprepared. For Hurricane Gustav, TV networks have been preparing since late last week, bringing in hundreds of journalists and support staff, and positioning equipment and supplies, writes Paul Gough for the Hollywood Reporter. read more »