JOURNALISM IN THE AMERICAS

A News Blog

TOPIC: newspaper


Since Crítica, of Buenos Aires, stopped circulating April 29, its 190 reporters, editors, photographers and other workers have done all they can to keep their jobs. They have organized protests and meetings and have occupied the newsroom 24-7 for three months. This week they refused to comply with a court eviction order issued by the magistrate in charge of the bankruptcy process of the company, according to the Facebook campaign “Salvemos al Diario Critica”, or Let's Save the Crítica Newspaper." (Also see the campaign blog). read more »

A group of people in a car threw five Molotov cocktails at the headquarters of the Capriles newspaper chain, one of Venezuela's leading media conglomerates, Tal Cual and Últimas Noticias report. read more »

Crítica newspaper of Buenos Aires stopped circulating more than a month ago when its 190 employees went on strike April 29 over not receiving their paychecks. Fearing the closure of the paper, the journalists united in a resistance movement, which includes a 24-hour camp-out in the newsroom and demonstrations in the street. read more »

Other Related Headlines:
» Employees of Argentine newspaper Crítica protest outside Spanish consulate (El País)
» Argentine media workers sleep in newspaper building, fearing its closure (El Mundo)

A crowd of federal employees demanding their daily work shifts be cut from eight hours a day to six threw eggs and firecrackers at the headquarters of Última Hora newspaper in Asunción, Paraguay.com reports. ABC Color said 700 employees were involved in the demonstration. read more »

The Washington Post won 2010 Pulitzer Prizes on Monday, in the areas of international reporting, feature writing, commentary and criticism. ProPublica, a nonprofit news organization, shared a prize for investigative journalism with The New York Times Magazine for a story about deaths at a New Orleans medical center after Hurricane Katrina.

The Public Service gold medal went to the Bristol (Va.) Herald Courier. read more »

The Virgin Islands Daily News and one of its reporters were ordered to pay Judge Leon Kendall $240,000 for knowingly making false statements about him. The paper says it will appeal the verdict that it defamed the judge with malice, the Associated Press reports. read more »

Speculation by Wall Street traders and bloggers this week that telecom executive Carlos Slim was quietly working to take the NY Times Co. private boosted the company’s stock price and fed the rumor mill, but Slim has denied planning to take over the company. See reports by Bloomberg and other sources. read more »

Windows were smashed over the weekend at the offices of Uthayan, a Tamil community newspaper in Toronto. The publisher received an anonymous phone call describing the vandalism as retaliation for a trip to Sri Lanka by a Canadian business delegation, the National Post reports. read more »

Many journalists complain about the changes Internet has brought to the field by making newspapers less popular. But Canada's The Globe and Mail went even further by publishing a video on the web with a song lamenting the loss of space to blogs and online news services. read more »

USA Today and the daily newspaper El Nuevo Día will begin publishing a Puerto Rican edition on Monday, Feb. 22. (See statements by USA Today and El Nuevo Día.) read more »

Recent research into the social spread of news showed that readers are more likely to e-mail articles that are positive, practical, or inspire a sense of awe, The New York Times reports. read more »

The son and daughter of the Clarín media group executive and major shareholder have given blood samples at a federal forensic agency to determine if they are victims of a forced adoption scheme under the last dictatorship, BBC explains in English, and El País (Spain) in Spanish. read more »

Other Related Headlines:
» Children have complied with court orders, family lawyer says (Clarín, La Nación, etc.–Spanish)
» Judge's order to take DNA in morgue, rather than genetic lab—"knowingly violated the law," group leader says (Página 12)
» Big private media are trying to hide essential aspects of the case, TeleSUR warns (TeleSURtv)

The Post confirms it will close the bureaus in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles on Dec. 31. Six correspondents will be offered jobs in Washington, and three news assistants will lose their jobs, a Post memo quoted by Politico and other sources say. The paper will cover the nation from the capital, and reporters will travel to important stories. read more »

The New York Times has 1,250 newsroom employees but says it needs to reduce its news department by 8 percent by year’s end. The paper will offer employee buyouts but will be forced to make layoffs if it can’t persuade enough people to leave voluntarily, The Times reports. See this memo announcing the move. read more »

The Washington Post and washingtonpost.com will create one organization starting Jan. 1, 2010, the Washington Business Journal reports, citing a memo that Post publisher Katharine Weymouth sent to employees.

The Washington Post and the Washington Post Digital organization, which operates washingtonpost.com, will be integrated into The Washington Post, the Business Journal says. read more »

The Inter American Press Association (IAPA) condemned "acts of intimidation" against Clarín's executives and facilities. The Association of Argentine TV and Radio Broadcasters (ATA) also protested the actions, La Nación reports. read more »

The Boston Globe had already printed and shipped its two first editions when news broke Wednesday at 1:25 a.m. that Sen. Edward Kennedy had died of brain cancer. But the paper stopped its presses five minutes later to change the front page and several inside pages, Editor & Publisher reports. read more »

The Telegraph-Journal of Saint John, New Brunswick issued a front-page apology to Prime Minister Stephen Harper for its earlier story suggesting he slipped a communion wafer into his jacket pocket during a Catholic funeral mass. read more »

Unionized employees of two of the island's leading newspapers, El Nuevo Día and El Vocero, have approved strikes to protest cost-cutting moves proposed by the two respective companies, the Associated Press and EFE report. read more »

The Las Vegas Review-Journal recently reported on a business owner facing trial for 57 counts of income tax evasion, tax fraud and criminal conspiracy. read more »