Knight Center
Knight Center

JOURNALISM IN THE AMERICAS Blog

Brazilian journalists create platform to connect scientists and the press

Despite the large number of scientific studies published each day in Brazil, finding the people behind the research can be a great challenge, and getting them to talk an even bigger one. 

Faced with this reality, Brazilian researchers and journalists created a platform to serve as a bridge between researchers and the press, in addition to helping change the culture of sharing scientific research in the country. Read more »


Threatened Brazilian journalist killed by gunmen in Paraguay in dangerous border region


By Júlio Lubianco and Marina Estarque

Brazilian journalist Lourenço Veras, known as Léo Veras, editor-in-chief of the website Porã News, was assassinated on the night of Feb. 12 in Pedro Juan Caballero, Paraguay. The city is next to the Brazi’s Ponta Porã. Read more »


Venezuelan reporters reinvent themselves abroad with print and online journalistic ventures


By Silvina Acosta*

**This is the second post in a two-part series about Venezuelan journalists who left their country in search of work and security, and have set up journalistic initiatives abroad. Read more »


Chauvinist attacks on Brazilian journalist who reported illegal use of social networks in 2018 campaign generate indignation

Folha de S. Paulo journalist Patrícia Campos Mello was once again the target of a series of attacks on her reputation on Feb. 11, after the testimony of a witness to the Joint Parliamentary Commission of Inquiry (CPMI, for its acronym in Portuguese) that investigates fake news in the 2018 Brazilian presidential campaign. Read more »


Complaint against journalist Glenn Greenwald is rejected by Brazilian court

After a judge rejected a complaint to indict him for involvement with hackers who accessed Telegram messages from several Brazilian authorities, U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald said that he is going to the Supreme Court in search of a decision that guarantees more clearly what the federal constitution says. Read more »


After 500 days of its paper being withheld by the government, La Prensa of Nicaragua negotiates its release

Nicaraguan newspaper La Prensa reported that there is a negotiation underway for the release of tons of paper and other materials, held by customs for more than 500 days, according to a note from the editorial board, published on Feb. 5. The blockade has imposed severe restrictions on the circulation of the newspaper and threatened its survival. Read more »


Independent journalists face social polarization after the departure of former President Evo Morales

Polarization persists in Bolivia after former leftist President Evo Morales resigned and fled the country and conservative politician Jeanine Áñez declared herself interim president. Meanwhile, journalists working in the country are finding themselves caught in the middle.

For journalist Raúl Peñaranda, director of the site Brújula Digital, the pressure, criticism and threats by state officials have stopped in comparison with the practices of the previous government. Read more »


Venezuelan journalists move their lives and work abroad in order to find a better future


By Silvina Acosta*

*This is the first post in a two-part series about Venezuelan journalists who have left their country in search of work and security. The second half will explore experiences and cases of successful journalistic initiatives by migrant reporters. Read more »


Covering the 2020 U.S. election: Reporters from national media will discuss campaign trail challenges at the 21st ISOJ

Reporters on the front lines of election coverage face a myriad of new challenges created by digital media. They work hard to keep voters accurately informed at a time of information overload, disinformation, misinformation and distrust of the press. Read more »


RESEARCH: How country regime type can translate to a dangerous environment for journalists


As democracy has weakened globally over the last quarter century, local authoritarians became the chief threat to journalists, a condition many Latin Americans will recognize. We must highlight local journalists’ contributions to democratic accountability and protection of rights as we pressure national governments to reverse this trend.


By Sallie Hughes* Read more »


 


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