Knight Center
Knight Center

Topic “social media”

CBS Sports blogger fired over false tweet prematurely reporting Paterno's death

CBSSports.com blogger Adam Jacobi was fired for publishing an erroneous tweet that prematurely reported the death of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, according to Poynter. Jacobi tweeted the false news of Paterno's death, without citing his information source. Read more »


Freedom of expression concerns over Twitter's country-specific censorship ability prompt users to call for protest

In a bid to "enter countries that may have different ideas about the contours of freedom of expression," Twitter announced that it has the ability to begin censoring tweets on a country-by-country basis, the Associated Press (AP) reported Thursday, Jan. 26. Read more »


Student website prompts firestorm of false news as U.S. media scramble, prematurely reporting Paterno's death

In another example of news organizations jumping the gun as false information spreads like wildfire across Twitter, U.S. media outlets prematurely reported the death of Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, driving home the lesson that "social media tools do not need to force news organizations to compromise their standards," according to The New York Times. Read more »


Knight Center's first Facebook photo contest exceeds all expectations

"Steel Mill" by José Gregorio Alvarado Pérez

The first Knight Center Photography Contest closed on Jan. 10, awarding José Gregorio Alvarado Pérez the top prize for his photo "Steel Mill," which received 390 votes, counted as "likes" on Facebook. Read more »


AP revises its Twitter guidelines -- again

For the third time in the past year, the Associated Press (AP) has updated its social media guidelines, this time to deal with correcting erroneous tweets and deleting tweets, as well as proper procedure for designating a re-tweet, according to a press release from the news agency. Read more »


U.S. government regularly monitoring news blogs, social media

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security regularly monitors dozens of websites, including Facebook, Twitter, WikiLeaks, YouTube, and even the New York Times Lede Blog, Global Voices Online, and the Blog del Narco, in order to "collect information used in providing situational awareness and establishing a common operating picture," reported Reuters on Thursday, Jan. 11. Read more »



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