Knight Center
Knight Center

Silvia Higuera's Blog

hosted by JOURNALISM IN THE AMERICAS

Silvia Higuera is a Colombian journalist who has written for the Knight Center since 2012. She has been interested in covering Latin American issues and human rights, especially the right to freedom of expression, and the investigate journalism. She studied Social Communication and Journalism at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana in Bucaramanga (Colombia), and received her Master of Arts in Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin in 2015. She worked with the Office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) under the Orlando Sierra fellowship during 2014. She also worked for the Colombian newspaper Vanguardia Liberal and wrote for different magazines about local, economic and public order issues. Her work has also appeared in The Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald of Miami. Email: silvia.knightcenter@gmail.com

Recent Blog Posts:

Dorrit Harazim of Brazil and Martín Caparrós of Argentina among winners of 2017 Maria Moors Cabot Awards

Brazilian columnist, publisher and documentarian Dorrit Harazim, and Argentine journalist and author Martin Caparrós are among the winners of the 2017 Maria Moors Cabot Award, announced on July 21 by the Read more »


Member states of the OAS pass resolution obligating them to fight violence against journalists in the region

The recent signing of a resolution by the General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS) is now part of the working arguments used by the Office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR).

Edison Lanza, Special Rapporteur of the IACHR of the OAS, will now consider the resolution as it becomes part of the legal body with which governments can be urged to comply. Read more »


Ecuadorian judge determines that journalist Martín Pallares is not guilty in case filed by Rafael Correa

“Innocent.” These were the words Ecuadorian journalist Martín Pallares used to summarize the judge’s decision in a July 3 hearing for a suit filed against the journalist by former President Rafael Correa. The ex-leader, who was not present at the hearing, sued Pallares on June 5 in response to an article he wrote. Read more »


Ecuador's communications law has sanctioned 675 media outlets and journalists in four years

When Ecuador approved the Organic Law of Communication (LOC for its acronym in Spanish) in 2013, different organizations inside and outside the country expressed concern about the negative ef Read more »


CPJ demands the Mexican government end a cycle of violence and impunity against the press

Mexico is one of the deadliest countries to practice journalism. This has been repeated in recent years by different organizations that defend freedom of the press both in the country and abroad. Read more »


ISOJ 2017: Bots and artificial intelligence arrive on the scene to help media engage with audiences

When it comes to including robots in journalism, the greatest fear revolves around how they will replace humans in their reporting. However, if there is something shared by speakers in the panel "Conversational journalism: how bots and artificial intelligence can get us there,” it’s that this technology was created to help journalists in their work and that they are reliant on humans to operate. Read more »


More than 1,700 judges and other justice operators already accepted for online course on freedom of expression

There are 1,738 magistrates, judges and other justice operators from Latin America who have been accepted to take part in the fifth edition of the course “International legal framework on freedom of expression, access to information and protection of journalists,” which will start May 8. Applications are still open for the course, which will be conducted in Spanish. Read more »


Journalists attacked during anti-government protests in Venezuela

The protests and the crises that followed the decision of the Venezuelan Supreme Court (TSJ) to suspend the powers of the National Assembly on Wednesday, March 29, have once again left the press in its most vulnerable position: security forces have assaulted reporters covering the protests, according to reports. Read more »


Mexican reporters create lab that offers scholarships to promote investigative journalism in their country

The “barrage” of censorship and pressure to which Mexican journalists have been exposed in recent years reminds reporter Alexandra Xanic of the 1990s. The dependence of the media on official advertising, reductions in newsrooms and the search by media outlets to “fill spaces,” mean that investigative journalism is increasingly forgotten, and the little that is done fails to have the impact it should. Read more »


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